Priest outed via Grindr app highlights rampant data tracking

Priest outed via Grindr app highlights rampant data tracking

FOLLOW ON Advertisement A person checks the Grindr app on their mobile phone in Beirut, Lebanon, on May 29, 2019. (Hassan Ammar / AP) When a religious publication used smartphone app data to deduce the sexual orientation of a high-ranking Roman Catholic official, it exposed a problem that goes far beyond a debate over church doctrine and priestly celibacy. With few U.S. restrictions on what companies can do with the vast amount of data they collect from web page visits, apps and location tracking built into phones, there's not much to stop similar spying on politicians, celebrities and just about anyone that's a target of another person's curiosity -- or malice. Citing allegations of "possible improper behaviour," the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops on Tuesday announced the resignation of its top administrative official, Monsignor Jeffrey Burrill, ahead of a report by the Catholic news outlet The Pillar that probed his private romantic life. The Pillar said it obtained "commercially available" location data from a vendor it didn't name that it "correlated" to Burrill's phone to determine that he had visited …
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