The Top 10: Conservative Pop Songs

The Top 10: Conservative Pop Songs

This list was just an excuse to start several arguments, including ones about the definition of “conservative”, when poses become ironic, and why there is a “No Beatles” rule in my Top 10s. Anyway, here we go. 1. “I Fought The Law”, The Crickets, 1960. (Some people prefer the version by The Clash, 1979.) “Pro law and order,” said Conor Downey, Whitstable Stevie and Steven Fogel. 2. “Ballad of the Green Berets”, Barry Sadler, 1966. Counter-counterculture hit in the US at the time of Vietnam war protests. Thanks to John Peters and Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Pink Dress. 3. “Sympathy for the Devil”, The Rolling Stones, 1968. Excellent nomination from Amanda Graham. 4. “Okie from Muskogee”, Merle Haggard, 1969. Such an anti-hippie tirade that several bands covered it as a spoof. Nominated by John Peters, Tamara, Chris Smith, Graham Fildes, Ben Milne and Conor Downey. 5. “Sunny Afternoon”, The Kinks, 1966. “The tax man’s taken all my dough…” Nominated by Steven Fogel and Wario Argento, although Paul T Horgan said that the song is not sympathetic to the aristocratic …
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