The magic angle of twisted graphene

The magic angle of twisted graphene

Graphene, a two-dimensional material composed exclusively of carbon, has revealed extraordinary properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity, transparency, and flexibility. When combined, these properties become particularly interesting in the age of touch screens and flexible electronics. "Unlike 3-D materials, graphene has a height reduced to the ultimate dimension of the atom. It's therefore a carbon atom plane," explains Prof. Jean-Christophe Charlier, a specialist in nanoscopic physics at the Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences of UCLouvain. In a study published in Nature, the scientist and his team dissected the behavior of electrons when two layers of graphene superimposed at an angle of 1.1 degrees (the so-called 'magic angle') produce a moiré effect. Well known to photographers, painters and fashion specialists, this optical effect consists of a figure composed of dark and light domains resulting from the superposition of two gratings. "When two layers of graphene are superimposed with this magic angle, they give rise to superconductivity. They therefore conduct electricity without any resistance," Prof. Charlier says. This property is more than useful for transporting electricity without loss of energy. "We've …
More on: phys.org