Spirit of the Beehive: ENTERTAINMENT, DEATH Album Review

Spirit of the Beehive: ENTERTAINMENT, DEATH Album Review

The term “Kmart realism” was first coined in the 1980s to describe a trend in literary fiction defined by sparse sentences, fast food joints, and the hyper-acceleration of capitalism and commercialization in primarily suburban spaces. Kmart realists like Mary Robison, Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, and, to some extent, Don DeLillo, wrote about the eerie feeling of walking through a shopping mall at night, of relaxing in front of the TV only to be greeted by endless advertisements for personal injury lawyers and small-town waterparks, of sending your brain into oblivion with synthetic drugs. The term could also be applied to Spirit of the Beehive, the project of psychotropic Philly punks Zack Schwartz, Rivka Ravede, and Corey Wichlin, whose excellent fourth album, ENTERTAINMENT, DEATH, is lit by that same, terrifying, phosphorescent glow. If you were to try to hold a conversation while listening to ENTERTAINMENT, DEATH, you would forget what you were saying as the words spilled out of your mouth. It is an inherently destabilizing album, one that doesn’t adhere to any concrete narrative. Instead, it’s fragmented, sewn together with …
More on: pitchfork.com