'Minari' Review: Tackling The Travails Of Immigrant Life With Humor And Humanity

'Minari' Review: Tackling The Travails Of Immigrant Life With Humor And Humanity

'Minari' Follows A Family's Immigration With Humor, Humanity And Hope The history of film is inseparable from immigration. Newcomers to America didn't merely pack the nickelodeons and movie palaces, they invented Hollywood. Ever since silent film days, filmmakers have sought to chronicle our vast immigrant experience — from the Sicilian Corleones gaining power through crime in The Godfather to Pakistani-born Kumail Nanjiani alienating his Muslim parents by falling for a white American girl in The Big Sick. The travails of immigrant life take a quietly beguiling form in Minari, a semi-autobiographical film by Lee Isaac Chung that brims with humor, humanity and hope. Showing us characters new to American screens, the story centers on a South Korean family named Yi who hope to make a go of farming in rural Arkansas during the Reagan years. Minari takes its title from the name of a spicy Asian plant that's known for its hardiness and ability to grow seemingly anywhere. The question is, will the same prove true of the Yi family? The action begins with the four of them arriving in …
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