COVID-19 vaccines prevent coronavirus infection, studies imply

COVID-19 vaccines prevent coronavirus infection, studies imply

The COVID-19 vaccines being administered in the U.S. were authorized for use because they dramatically reduced the risk of getting the disease when tested in clinical trials. However, those trials didn’t test the vaccines’ ability to prevent a coronavirus infection — the first step on the road to COVID-19. Scientists suspect the vaccines do thwart infections to some extent. Two new studies bolster their case. Both studies compare coronavirus infection rates among vaccinated and unvaccinated people who work at a single medical center. And in both cases, being vaccinated was indeed associated with a significantly lower risk of testing positive for an infection. Hospital employees make good study subjects because they were among the very first people to get access to COVID-19 vaccines. That means they have a longer track record to mine when it comes to assessing the performance of the shots. Another upside: Many hospitals routinely screen their workers for coronavirus infections. That makes it possible to identify people who seem perfectly healthy but harbor the SARS-CoV-2 virus in their system — and have the potential to spread …
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