Companies provide services, encourage connections as they prioritize mental health

Companies provide services, encourage connections as they prioritize mental health

Indianapolis-based Lessonly has always tried to be a wellness-oriented company, a place where CEO Max Yoder regularly communicated with employees about taking time to mind their physical and mental health. Still, when employees faced with the stresses of the pandemic last year started asking for help to cope, Megan Jarvis, the company’s vice president of talent, realized Lessonly’s benefits in that area were lacking. “The answer I gave was never one that I was in love with,” she said. Sure, the training-software tech firm offered health insurance. And it had an employee assistance program, a benefit that traditionally offers some counseling for mental health and financial problems and referrals to specialists. But Jarvis said that EAP was a bit of an afterthought, an add-on benefit that came with other services the company offered. “It didn’t feel like a warm handoff,” she said of referring employees to the EAP. “I didn’t feel the confidence that I want to feel.” So in January, Lessonly began offering an enhanced employee assistance program to its 200 workers that offers more services to employees in …
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