Central America's Dry Corridor: The unpredictable, serious reason driving mass migration to the US

Central America's Dry Corridor: The unpredictable, serious reason driving mass migration to the US

About 11 million people, roughly a quarter of Central America's total population, live in the Dry Corridor - a mostly mountainous area on the Pacific side of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Costa Rica, which experts say is prone to drought. Environmental migrants from the region are forced to leave their homelands because of the chaos of changing climatic conditions. It rains when it should be dry, it's burning hot when it should be cool and if they have managed to grow a meagre crop through these unseasonal variations, they get smashed by multiple hurricanes. Thousands of families have simply given up. High in the mountains of Jocotan in eastern Guatemala we hiked our way to a village and to a thatched mud-walled, windowless hut built precariously into the side of a steep hill. In the middle of the day it was dark inside. A woman greeted us and volunteer aid worker Sofia Letona and took us inside. On a bed covered with a simple cloth she revealed her two children. Tiny and starving. The youngest, Jason Gosol, was two …
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