Cancer misinformation on the rise on social media, Huntsman Cancer Institute study says

Cancer misinformation on the rise on social media, Huntsman Cancer Institute study says

SALT LAKE CITY — Many of us turn to the internet for information about our health, but a new Utah study finds misinformation surrounding cancer treatments is growing on social media. It may be human nature to peruse social media for answers after a cancer diagnosis, but experts say following advice found online without talking to your doctor first can be harmful. "I call it the murky waters of the internet," said Dr. Skyler Johnson, an assistant professor in the University of Utah's School of Medicine and radiation oncologist at the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Johnson did just that when his wife got cancer during medical school. "The first thing we did is hopped online to figure out, 'What are the treatment options, what's the prognosis like?'" Johnson said. Johnson is now the lead researcher at the Huntsman Cancer Institute looking at misinformation online. "We know that patients who choose to use treatments that don't have scientific support for them are putting their own health at risk," he said. Their study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, found …
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